Neil Patrick Harris. Photo by Art Streiber. 

Neil Patrick Harris. Photo by Art Streiber. 

Art Streiber is one of the best-known, most-prolific portrait and entertainment photographers in the country. In the past two decades, he has been commissioned by every major culture-oriented magazine in America, from Vanity Fair, Entertainment Weekly, and Rolling Stone to Esquire, Wired, New York, Town & Country, and Time, resulting in an archive of portraiture of the most intriguing newsmakers at the start of the 21st century. Art is also a regular contributor to, and collaborator with, all of the major Hollywood studios and networks, having shot key art for ABC, CBS, NBC, HBO, and MTV and movie posters for Universal Studios, DreamWorks, and Sony Pictures.

To all of his assignments he brings a deep understanding of both his craft and his subjects. “Being photographed can be a surreal experience, so I try to make it as natural and unpretentious as possible,” says Art. “The same goes for the style of my photography. I try to achieve a look that is organic and accessible, but at the same time I want to keep my portraiture elevated and noble. I’m attempting to celebrate who my subjects are and what they have achieved.”

Art’s images connect with people immediately and stay with them long after they’ve fallen in love at first sight. His elegant black & white nude portraits of the USA Women's Water Polo team, for example, are still being buzzed about online some two years after they appeared in ESPN The Magazine’s Body Issue. This ability to produce classic, iconic photographs—so rare in an age of the ephemeral—has won him numerous awards, the loyalty of his clients, and some incredibly rare opportunities.

On January 13, 2012, Art was commissioned by Paramount Studios to photograph 116 of the most influential actors, actresses, directors, and executives—all at one time—who have worked at the legendary Hollywood studio. Vanity Fair published the portrait, and TV and print coverage soon followed in abundance. “The experience,” says Art, “was epic.”